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How Much Protein Do You Need?

There’s no truth behind the statement that a body is only able to process so much protein at one time, and it’s interesting to surmise as to what happens when you exceed that number.

The topic of protein is a very misunderstood subject. Most of this stems from the way we use it in our diets to stave off a deficiency instead of its optimal amount. To make sure that you’re getting a sufficient amount of the vital amino acids, you’ll need to ingest between 50 to 60 grams of protein daily. Many nutritionists feel that to exceed that number is a waste.

Most individuals find they want to utilize protein in a way to train at peak levels, optimum performance and lose weight. In order to do this, you need to look beyond the deficiencies to see what is needed to build muscle. Protein synthesis is at the center, and the force needed to ignite the process.

Studies from the University of Texas are looking into perfecting the process and trying to determine if timing can affect your protein intake. One group of volunteers consumed a high protein meal of 90 grams at the end of the day, while another consumed 30 grams of protein throughout the day. Eating protein at every meal yielded greater success at increasing the protein synthesis.

It would seem that 30 grams of protein is the ideal amount to achieve maximum protein synthesis and any more at one sitting would do nothing to further increase things. Fortunately, protein has a number of uses and any excess can be used for other things such as energy.

Protein is a metabolic nutrient and estimates have shown that it can take twice the number of calories for your body to break down than it does with a meal high in carbohydrates.

Protein also exudes different hormonal elements than it does with carbohydrates and can create and keep a lean body. Insulin and glucagon are released when an individual consumes carbs and puts the brakes on fat release. The insulin also moves sugars in the muscle cells, resulting in low-blood sugar. As your body releases the glucagon, it takes the stored sugar from your liver and places it into your system to help maintain a normal blood sugar level. Glucagon also satiates your hunger and may stimulate your cells to release fat.

This is more than a collegiate introspection because protein is extremely effective in every day life. A diet high in protein has been shown to achieve greater weight-loss results and better body composition. However, any increase in your protein synthesis can be put to good use, and your body will find other ways to utilize it.

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